Crime Scene Cleanup Certification

888-431-7233

crime scene cleanup google button image crime scene cleanup yahoo symbol crime scene cleanup bing image Crime Scene Cleanup Home Button
So often I hear from young and not so young men and women seeking a future in crime scene cleanup. Often times they're told, "You can't become a crime scene cleaner with a certification." It seemed to me years ago this story became like an urban myth. It seemed to me these story tellers were people in the business of "certification." Yet, they could not point to rules, regulations, or laws requiring "crime scene cleanup certification." At this writing, to my knowledge, the only "certification" required is an OSHA certification in bloodborne pathogen training. So I heard about this certification business when I became a crime scene cleaner, Other than this, I could never find anyone willing to tell me who certifies the certifiers? read more

Alcohol and Crime

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

(Who wrote this?)

Crime scene cleanup work began with a sense of caution because blood exposure signaled deeply held cultural taboos. Watch commercial media and see vampires and bloody horror films exalted. Horror films also cast blood in demonic settings. Early crime scene cleanup technicians must have experienced grave anxiety. In fact, even today some newer crime scene cleanup technicians over exaggerate the biohazards.

Yet, it's always better to error on the side of safety than to risk inoculating yourself. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, and toxins unfriendly to the human body play havoc once the crime scene cleanup technician accidentally inoculates himself.

Today most crime scene cleanup technicians look for concrete meanings in biohazard cleanup work. Science tells us that microorganisms and other biologicals destroy life with less mass than we might have expected one hundred years ago.

In fact, two hundred years ago we were still learning to wash our hands, a subject you know too well about. As important a role hand washing plays in disease control, there are many microorganisms out there passing through human and nonhuman populations by blood contamination and airborne contamination. If you care to learn more about some of the viruses we live with, and will sooner-or-later play host to, visit this VIRUS link. TOP

Crime scene cleanup following a violent crime or violent suicide still raises some anxiety. True we have protective clothing and helpful information, viruses like HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C may contaminate a biohazard cleanup environment. Of course Hepatitis C tops the list of concerns because this tiny virus has a life expectancy of days in the wild, outside a controlled environment.

What makes this survivor virus wicked includes damage to internal organs. It leads to a near or total bleedout at death. Because death usually follows its contamination and destruction of the body, Hepatitis C, with its long life expectancy in the wild, requires forethought and distance when cleaning. For those unfortunate infected few, healthy living, exercise, and other worthwhile hygiene habits help to slow Hepatitis C's destructive destiny, and little else works to stop it. TOP

HIV carries the second most concern for crime scene cleanup technicians. HIV contraction means bad news, but HIV infection need not always become lethal. Known as AIDS in its advanced stage of development. AIDS kills. HIV will respond to the miracle of chemistry in about 80% of the human population.

Most reports of AIDS began to surface around 1981. Because of cultural taboos its place among known diseases took some years before people believed the truth of it. Even President Reagan at the time insisted that AIDS belonged solely to the homosexual population, and in a sense AIDS represented payback for lives gone wrong. The religious leaders of the southern states and elsewhere proclaimed AIDS represented signs of a sinful life and the devil took the hindmost.

Today we accept AIDS as a terrible disease that kills many people from many different backgrounds. When it comes to crime scene cleanup of biohazards, we prepare well in advance to confront blood and bloodborne pathogens (blood carried germs) in the wild.

Why do we have Crime Scene Cleaners?

In brief, other types of cleaning businesses do not approach cleaning like the crime scene cleanup companies approach their type of crime scene cleanup.

Looking to the history of crime scene cleanup, families and businesses experiencing a violent death from a crime or suicide would rather not clean after the traumatic death. Until recently, within the last 30 years, carpet cleaners and morticians filled this crime scene cleaning need for the few families with discretionary income.

Others began to specialize in this new "crime scene cleanup" industry because of its income potential. When congress passed its bloodborne pathogen legislation, it created an inevitable crime scene cleanup industry.

A sense of caution grew because blood exposure meant exposure to bloodborne pathogens like HIV. Long held cultural taboos also followed blood exposure to the crime scene cleanup technicians without formal biological training. These two elements of crime scene cleanup accounted for those early, extraordinary crime scene cleanup fees.

Early crime scene cleanup technicians must have experienced anxiety as a result. In fact, even today some newer crime scene cleanup technicians exaggerate the biohazards, which creates a problem for education around genuine concerns.

Keep in mind that bloodborne biohazards give way to frequent hand washing, but needle stick and other puncture wounds should give rise to caution. Inhaling dried, flaky blood also requires special caution when begriming a crime scene cleanup job. Because wet and moist blood present possible Hepatitis C infection and other illnesses, we consider wet and moist blood, as well as dried, flaky blood, among the biohazard waste materials.

So the risks of physical injury persist throughout crime scene cleanup as in any other field, but magnified by blood's dangers. The risk of physical injury during demolition work exist like in any construction trade, but for blood's dangers. As a biohazard cleanup of the environment often entails wearing protective clothing, a hallmark of biohazard cleanup.

Because death begins the decomposition process when the heart stops beating, contamination of the death scene with Hepatitis C, with its long life expectancy in the wild, requires forethought and distance when cleaning.

For those unfortunate infected few, healthy living, exercise, and other worthwhile hygiene habits help to slow Hepatitis C's destructive destiny, and little else works to stop it.

HIV carries the second most concern for crime scene cleanup technicians.

Known as AIDS in its advanced stage of development.

Today we accept AIDS as a terrible disease that kills many people from many different backgrounds.

When it comes to crime scene cleanup of biohazards, we prepare well in advance to confront blood and bloodborne pathogens (blood carried germs) in the wild.

Crime scene cleaners emerged because it is now easier to catch a disease from cleaning crime scenes.

Now, blood-borne pathogen's have become more dangerous and easier to contract.

So the business field known as Crime Scene Cleanup has grown to serve the needs of blood cleanup for residential, commercial, and industrial environments.

That is, women were 15 times more likely to contract HIV from sexual intercourse with a male than vice versa.

Health employees were the most obvious group of US workers at risk, but these rules are applied to most employees in the private sector.

Because of this, no one can clean a bloody environment or be involved with work involving possible exposure to blood or OPIM (Other Potentially Infectious Matter) without blood-borne pathogen training.

What is probably important for those interested in becoming a "Crime Scene Cleaner," to this writer's knowledge, is that there is no private "certification" needed to clean a bloody scene.

So if a school owner or a Crime Scene Cleanup business tells the reader that they must be "certified," the reader needs to ask, "Certified by whom?".

For crime scene cleanup, certification in bloodborne pathogen training is found quite cheaply and quickly through the American Red Cross.

TOP


 

Crime Scene Cleanup Menu Button

@ Eddie Evans    • Business Internet Marketing • Web Ranker